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Posts Tagged ‘communication strategy’

The Periodic Table of Videos From University of Nottingham

by June 15, 2011

periodic-table

Periodic Table, with colors representing numbers of views for each element's videos. Red is more than 200K, blue less than 10K.

I have a chronic problem of letting my issues of Science and Nature pile up. Having picked up an issue essentially at random from the pile, I experienced that reminder that I’m missing a lot by not keeping the pile under control.

Video journalist Brady Haran and chemist Martyn Poliakoff authored an article in the 27 May 2011 issue about their amazingly successful project to create videos for each element on the periodic table.

Having just watched the video for hydrogen, I am really impressed. It is no wonder that they have amassed a loyal following and over 15 million views in total. Lots to learn from this impressive science communication endeavor!

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Tom Toles Weighs In on Explaining versus Persuading

by June 15, 2011

A few days ago I wrote a post on the importance of of nonpersuasive communication. Scanning the Washington Post site just now, I noticed that Tom Toles, my favorite political cartoonists, weighed in on the topic two days ago in a post entitled “Explaining and Persuading.” His statement that “[t]hese are two things that seem like they ought to go together, but somehow rarely do” illuminates the issue nicely within a different domain: inside the Beltway.

This reminds me of advice of a PR exec this week at the Google Science Communication workshop, which I had the honor of attending: scientists should “stay in their lane.” It can be a very tough pill to swallow when one feels that decisions do not line up with the latest understanding from the science community, but as Baruch Fischhoff stated in an ES&T piece discussed in my previous post:

Scientists faced with others’ advocacy may feel compelled to respond in kind. However, they can also try to become the trusted source for credible, relevant, comprehensible information by doing the best job possible of nonpersuasive communication. With long-term problems, like climate change, communication is a multiple-play game. Those who resort to advocacy might lose credibility that they will need in future rounds.

I sure wish Toles would pen a cartoon on this topic!

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