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Posts Tagged ‘content analysis’

Relevancy and Context are “Critical” with Sentiment Analysis

by May 24, 2011

September 11 Whenever I come across a piece that highlights how tricky sentiment analysis truly is, I tend to be encouraged more often than dissuaded to keep trying to figure it out.

Sentiment analysis is tough—not as in strict, like a teacher is tough, or in resilient, like a marathoner is tough. More like hard, like an AP calculus test is tough.  Not hard, like a block of concrete is hard.  Hard, as in difficult.  Eh, nevermind.

A colleague of mine just sent me a piece from the Miller-McCune site discussing a flawed mood study about September 11 pager text messages.

Researchers from Johannes Gutenberg University in Germany had concluded that there was an escalating level of “anger” words communicated to pagers as time passed on September 11 (here’s the study).  I’ve included the original data graph in this post. (more…)

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Hope for Human Sentiment Analysis Coding

by May 13, 2011

I just read an interesting blog post on Social Times discussing the advantages of machine-based sentiment analysis. In the piece, author Dr. Taras Zagibalov challenges the critics of “automatic” sentiment analysis, who claim that humans can better determine than computers the sentiment of social media text. He asserts that, with the proper tuning of a system’s classifier—creating specific classifiers for each domain (subject matter) and keeping them current—a machine-based sentiment analysis system can outperform human accuracy.

The discussion of human vs. machine sentiment is core to our work at Dialogue Earth, where we are developing Pulse—a social media analytics tool to help tease out nuances in the social media dialogue about key societal topics. Pulse social media analytics tool (more…)

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Just Around the Corner: A Longer-Running Pilot On Weather Emotions

by April 27, 2011

This week the weather in the U.S. has been pretty unusual. We set a record for rainfall here in the Twin Cities, which is really a footnote to the week compared to the violent extreme weather in the Southeast and beyond. While understanding how people are feeling about the weather day-to-day won’t change the weather, we see it as a great starting point for developing our Pulse system for tracking public opinion on issues discussed in the social media.

As a follow-on to our first weather pilot, we are gearing up to monitor mood about the daily weather across the U.S. for weeks at a time. In fact, we are just completing a run of about 8000 Twitter tweets through our “crowd-based sentiment engine” using the CrowdFlower platform. Once we have double-checked the results, we are set up now to collect tweets continuously, automatically send them over to CrowdFlower for sentiment judgments, have the judgments returned to our database automatically, and then publish the data on our interactive Pulse display. We expect to be analyzing several thousand tweets through CrowdFlower on a daily basis in order to create a detailed map of weather mood for the U.S. (see more here about our data sampling strategy). Look for more on this in the coming days. The image below is a sneak peek at our interactive platform, which our team has overhauled in recent weeks. It should prove to be a much-improved user experience!

Pulse social media analytics tool More »

News Monitoring Project: an Overview

by April 19, 2011

In Dialogue Earth’s quest to increase shared public understanding on issues of environmental importance, we stopped and asked ourselves: What do people already know? Where are they getting their information and what are the qualities of that information?

Suppose people collect information from three basic sources:

  • Personal experiences,
  • Interpersonal relationships and networks, and
  • Media.

Understanding the qualities of media information is particularly important because of it’s pervasiveness and roles in society as information disseminator, political watchdog, agenda setter, and entertainer.

Dialogue Earth’s News Monitoring project takes a look at the characteristics of information garnered from online print media, including both traditional and emerging sources. We use several layers of both quantitative and qualitative analysis including content, frame, and sentiment analysis. In the works, is a tool that will combine these different techniques to create a responsive and scalable synthesis of the moment’s top environmental news coverage. We hope this information will be useful for the communication development of a variety of individuals and groups.

Interested? Stay tuned for upcoming posts explaining the important project concepts in more detail.

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The Gulf Oil Disaster: a peek at the nature of its media coverage

by February 25, 2011

When the Deepwater Horizon wellhead blew out on April 20th this past spring, as with what happens in most catastrophic events, the media went into frenzy.  What followed was a continuous feed of news stories about the Gulf disaster for a little longer than three months. These stories not only described what had happened, but also speculated as to what should happen, made measures of accountability, debated on restorative and retributive justice and described the potential impacts on economic markets and environmental systems as a direct or secondary effect of the spill.

Articles were written from a few varying perspectives: the heartfelt human interest stories, which pushed to convey empathy by humanizing the events; stories told on the basis of markets, externalities, profit and loss; pieces highlighting the corresponding actions of heads of government and policy makers, and stories illustrating the threats that the disaster posed to ecological systems and also populations reliant on these systems.

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Engaging Experts from Across Society Transparently

by February 16, 2011

A recent article in the NY Times about the burgeoning array of question-and-answer (Q&A) sites couldn’t have been timelier timely for me. Our strategy here at Dialogue Earth depends on figuring out how to engage a network of experts from across society—not limited to just academics, but also subject-matter experts in industry, environmental advocacy groups, and beyond. Plus, I believe we should leverage the latest technology, like this new breed of Q&A sites, if possible.

Our approach at Dialogue Earth is deeply rooted in my experience working with hundreds of subject-matter experts while at the Heinz Center in D.C. Specifically, we tapped these experts to create the beginnings of a national system of indicators for the condition and use of U.S. Ecosystems: The State of the Nation’s Ecosystems. There’s more on this on our History page.

The challenge before me is to figure out how to recreate this amazingly powerful formula, while substantially reducing the turn-around time. We operated with committees that took months to converge on common ground, in part because they were charged with solving a number of issues. I need to get the same great quality of experts on-board in a process with turn-around times of hours or days. And, if that’s not enough to ask, I also believe the process needs to be completely transparent. (more…)

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