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Posts Tagged ‘mood’

Capturing Mood About Daily Weather From Twitter Posts

by September 29, 2011

After considerable preparation, we’ve just launched a version of our interactive tool, Pulse. Using Pulse, users can explore feelings about the weather as expressed on Twitter.

We began the process by choosing a topic that would yield a substantial volume of discussion on Twitter as well as be of general interest. Once we settled on weather, we wrote a survey designed to gauge Twitter users’ sentiments about the topic. With the help of workers from the “crowd” accessed through CrowdFlower, we had tens of thousands of relevant tweets coded as to the expressed emotion about the weather. These results were then used to create an “instance” of the Pulse tool, which manifests as a map of the United States that at a glance reveals Twitter users’ sentiments about the weather in their region on a given day. (You can read more about the coding process here and our choice of weather as a topic here.)

For our launch of Pulse for weather, we chose to feature tweets published over a month beginning in late April, 2011, a period in which many extreme weather events occurred—the devastating tornado in Joplin, MO; widespread drought throughout the South; and flooding of the Mississippi River, among others. The image below is from May 25, three days following the Joplin tornado (jump to the interactive map here).

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We gathered tweets from all 50 states as well as for about 50 metro areas. Here you can see a zoom up on several states centered on Missouri.

zoom-may-25-pulse

The interactive map tells part of the story, namely a state’s or city’s overall sentiment about the weather, while the content under the “Analysis” and “Events” tabs reveal some of the “why” behind this sentiment: what were some of the most notable weather events occurring on a given day? [Note: our "events" feature has a bug in it and is currently turned off. In the future, icons will show up on the map to highlight out-of-the-ordinary weather events, like outbreaks of tornadoes, persistent flooding or drought, etc.] To what extent did the weather deviate from normal conditions? Why were tweets from, say, the South, uniformly negative during a certain time? What was happening when we saw a single positive state amidst a region that was otherwise negative?

We hope that weather is just the beginning. We envision using the Pulse tool to visualize nationwide sentiments about more complex, nuanced topics in the future—a sample of emotions about gas prices is just around the corner, and see our preliminary work on opinions about global warming. For now, you can explore the Pulse tool here, and let us know what you think!

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Teasing Out Opinions About Global Warming From Twitter

by June 24, 2011

snapshot-ca A couple of months ago, we posted results from a quick sampling of mood about global warming in the Twittersphere that was featured in Momentum, the publication of the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment. Along with our work on weather mood and mood about gas prices, we are on the verge of releasing a more in-depth analysis of sentiment about global warming. Here, we explain the method behind our sentiment analysis related to global warming, building off an earlier post that presented some of the details of our methodology on studying global warming chatter. (more…)

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Just Around the Corner: A Longer-Running Pilot On Weather Emotions

by April 27, 2011

This week the weather in the U.S. has been pretty unusual. We set a record for rainfall here in the Twin Cities, which is really a footnote to the week compared to the violent extreme weather in the Southeast and beyond. While understanding how people are feeling about the weather day-to-day won’t change the weather, we see it as a great starting point for developing our Pulse system for tracking public opinion on issues discussed in the social media.

As a follow-on to our first weather pilot, we are gearing up to monitor mood about the daily weather across the U.S. for weeks at a time. In fact, we are just completing a run of about 8000 Twitter tweets through our “crowd-based sentiment engine” using the CrowdFlower platform. Once we have double-checked the results, we are set up now to collect tweets continuously, automatically send them over to CrowdFlower for sentiment judgments, have the judgments returned to our database automatically, and then publish the data on our interactive Pulse display. We expect to be analyzing several thousand tweets through CrowdFlower on a daily basis in order to create a detailed map of weather mood for the U.S. (see more here about our data sampling strategy). Look for more on this in the coming days. The image below is a sneak peek at our interactive platform, which our team has overhauled in recent weeks. It should prove to be a much-improved user experience!

Pulse social media analytics tool More »

Global Warming Chatter: A Hot Topic on Twitter?

by March 28, 2011

Some months ago, our research team developed a strategy for inferring opinions about global warming from Twitter for our Pulse platform. We were lucky to be asked last week if we could present such data for the next issue of Momentum, the award-winning publication of the University of Minnesota’s Institute on the Environment. Of course, like all of us on a deadline, they needed it “yesterday.”

Not to be deterred, we rapidly spun up our collection system to grab those Twitter tweets that included the keywords global warming, climate change, and #climate. For a six day period ending on 23 March, we collected about 7600 tweets that had some geo-location information associated with them. Based on our recent experience focused on weather mood (described in this post), and because we had already generated a good number of quality control units (as described here), we posted a major job on the CrowdFlower platform within a day of the request from the Momentum team. Here’s a snapshot of the results:

momentum_dropshadow_300dpi (more…)

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Teasing Out Weather Mood From Twitter Posts: A Pulse Pilot

by March 8, 2011

In choosing a topic to use as a test case for our Pulse social media analytics tool, we wanted to pick something that is broadly discussed. What better topic to start with than people’s mood about the weather? It is hard to escape having a few thoughts about the weather on a regular basis. Snow storms, sunny warm days, and heatwaves, to mention a few, cross party lines and ideological divides. Plus, people love to discuss the weather, so we figured there would be lots of chatter in the social media—and we haven’t been disappointed. Read more on our weather strategy here.

In this post, I describe our first demonstration of the Pulse platform to describe weather mood across the U.S. using 12,500 tweets collected on February 4th. While our process is a work in progress, there are several key steps: identifying and collecting useful social media posts, getting reliable judgments about the sentiment in these posts made by crowd-sourced workers, publishing the data on our Pulse platform, and finally, combining our sentiment data with external data sources to tease out a story about the drivers of the observed sentiment.

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Preparing to Extract Weather Mood from Tweets

by March 3, 2011

weather-tweet1

Yep, it was cold this morning in the Twin Cities. I didn’t need Twitter to tell that. Yet, we can’t always assume that, just because it is cold, people are upset, or that because it is warm, people are happy about the weather. But, we believe tweets will reveal something quite interesting: how people’s emotions are indirectly affected by the weather. For example, are people happy to be inside watching a movie even though it is “super chilly” outside? Or happy that the it is raining because it will help the garden, even though they may not be eager to be out in the rain themselves?

weather-tweet2

Having set the stage for tackling the issue of weather mood on our Pulse platform, here I describe our process for developing weather as a Pulse topic. (more…)

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Why Weather Mood for Pulse?

by February 14, 2011

As we developed our interactive platform for the analysis of dialogue in the social media, we needed to identify a topic to start with. Specifically, we needed to identify a topic that would have a high volume of chatter on Twitter, be of general interest, and present a decent challenge for our research team. Plus, we wanted a topic that was likely to vary geographically, because Pulse is fundamentally a platform for examining trends in dialogue across geographies. (more…)

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A Journey to Understand Social Media Sentiment

by February 14, 2011

Brand Bowl 2011

Chrysler stood atop the final standing for Brand Bowl 2011.

On Super Bowl Sunday, 106.5 million viewers were watching the big game—the largest TV audience ever, according to Nielsen. Many tuned in to witness the Packers battle the Steelers; even more, I imagine, were watching to see emerging brand Groupon face off against fan-favorite Go Daddy and advertising stalwarts Pepsi, Doritos and Volkswagen.

Millions were simultaneously browsing the Web, monitoring game stats and their Super Bowl pools, and checking out the brands advertised on the TV spots. A much smaller group of advertising and social media junkies were simultaneously glued to “Brand Bowl 2011,” a venture between ad agency Mullen and social media monitor Radian6 to monitor and rank the sentiment of Twitter references of Super Bowl advertisers. (more…)

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