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Posts Tagged ‘ocean acidification’

What Is Ocean Acidification?

by March 26, 2012

ANSWER (CURRENTLY UNDER REVIEW): A gradual yet steady change of ocean chemistry marked by a decrease in pH that is caused by increasing concentrations of carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. This answer is focused on changes to the ocean over recent decades. In addition to the infographic below, check out several videos on our YouTube channel that we produced through a video contest.
Q001 what is ocean acidification v0289

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Bringing the Global Carbon Cycle to Quora

by December 3, 2011

In a recent post about building a knowledge base for general consumption on the topic of ocean acidification, I suggested that it would be wise to step back and address questions-and-answers about the carbon cycle. This is a cross-posting of a post I just put up on Quora: The Carbon Cycle, Starting in.

And, the first question is also up on Quora: What are the compartments in which carbon is stored on Earth? Do you have the credentials to answer this, or do you know someone who does? Please help out—I believe it will be a rewarding way to bridge the gap between the science community and the rest of society. Also, keep in mind that “upvoting,” adding comments for the author, or suggesting edits,  as soon as there is one or more answers will be a really great way to participate.

For anyone new to Quora, I’d encourage you to take a look at a new infographic and video that helps explain how to have a winning strategy within the Quora community.

Any and all feedback is welcome!

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So You’re On Quora, Now What?

by October 16, 2011

As we gear up to tackle some basic questions and answers on Quora about the carbon cycle as part of our EarthQ project, with a goal of soon being able to tackle issues like ocean acidification and global warming, it seemed that a roadmap to Quora would be key for collaborators who might never have hear of it. Hence, the idea of a Quora Infographic emerged late this past week. Here’s version 0.1 that I’m throwing out for feedback. What do you think? Helpful? Silly? Gaping holes?

infographic-sketch-v02_small

UPDATE: Now showing version 0.2, thanks to a comment from friend Mike Troiano to highlight the start arrow. Keep the comments coming!

Version 0.1
infographic-sketch-v01_small

See this also on my post on Quora. I’d appreciate you up-voting it there if you like the idea.

Creative Commons License
So you’re on Quora, now what? by Dialogue Earth is licensed under a Creative Commons Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 3.0 Unported License. Permissions beyond the scope of this license should be submitted here.

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Building A Knowledge Base About Ocean Acidification on Quora

by October 13, 2011

Some months ago, we did a proof-of-concept video contest on the subject of ocean acidification. Here’s the winning video, about a snail that doesn’t have a shell, goes to learn why, and then forms a band to spread the word about this phenomenon.

Our overall vision is that we’d only initiate video, or other multimedia, projects once we’d nailed down the “science behind the story.” Furthermore, to us, nailing down the story means that we’ve ferreted out those key points for which we can get widespread agreement from experts drawn from across society–those from industry, NGOs, government, as well as academics.

To be blunt, we skipped this (huge) step for ocean acidification for two reasons. We were trying to proof out a crowd-based process for creating videos that conveyed science points fairly. Also, I had a good bit of background on the issue from my graduate work in oceanography.

102__0x0_quora-picture Now that we’re aiming to cultivate Q&As on Quora on topics related to the environment, it seems only logical to revisit the topic of ocean acidification. We’re dubbing this Quora-based project EarthQ (see also this post about putting candidates on the spot about global warming). For reference, see this post I did on the science behind the story of ocean acidification.

The goal of EarthQ will be to identify the top questions about various issues people are likely to ask about ocean acidification–assuming we can shepherd solid answers that are endorsed by a wide spectrum of experts. Taking this approach ties into Anticipating Questions People Will Ask About a Topic. Of course, if we’re successful, we will have created a great network of experts ready to jump to assistance as new questions emerge organically on Quora.

I’m a big advocate of working with building blocks on an issue. Having given this a good deal of thought recently, it is clear to me that step one will be to develop Q&A that fully explain the carbon cycle. Then, we can move on to the topic of ocean acidification. Then we should have worked out enough of the kinks to take on the topic of global warming. Onward!

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YouTube’s Hot Spot Analyses: Changing Behavior Raises Questions

by May 18, 2011

A few days ago, I wrote a post describing how three of our videos on the topic of ocean acidification measured up using the hot spots tool within YouTube’s Insights dashboard. Returning to this today, I planned to look at another batch of videos. When doing some comparisons, I realized that the hot spots graph had changed rather dramatically for one of the videos, “New Neighbor.” Here’s the before taken on 5.16.11:

new-neighbor

Today, I found a considerably different hot spots trace:

new-neighbor-hot-spots-5-17-11 (more…)

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Looking at the Hot (and Cold) Spots in Our Ocean Acidification Videos

by May 6, 2011

youtube_logoWe recently became aware of YouTube’s powerful, Insights analytical tool. It appears that YouTube gathers data on each view of a video, keeping track if people rewind to a particular spot or click away mid-way through. The result is a graph that shows attention or interest during the video, shown to the video’s owner through a simple interactive display that pairs the running video with a line moving on the interest graph. It looks like a video needs at least 500 or so views before YouTube will provide hot spot data. Having explored the idea of doing some in-depth market research, we assume that this is no replacement for detailed studies by market research firms.

Yet, what can we learn from this about our videos on the topic of ocean acidification? You can view all but one of them on our YouTube channel.

Our “No Shell Blues” video appears to be a solid performer based on the hot spot analysis. Perhaps we could conclude that it gets off to a slow start, yet viewers appear to be hooked once Timmy snail first makes a sound.

no-shell-blues (more…)

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Warming up, turning sour, losing breath: A Call for Dialogue

by May 2, 2011

In a recent blog post at Discover Magazine, Warming up, turning sour, losing breath, Carl Zimmer outlines some of the threats to the ocean and it’s related ecosystems posed by an increase in carbon dioxide in the atmosphere. He discusses the concept of a “triple whammy” put forth by environmental scientist Nicolas Gruber, who posited that three separate trends will equate to an impact greater than the sum of the parts: increased ocean warming, increased ocean acidification, and decreasing oxygen dissolved in the ocean.

Thus, it is of the utmost importance to have a clear dialogue that is backed by reliable, factual information, so that the situation can be properly assessed and we can move forward constructively to a solution. (more…)

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A Crowdsourcing Bill of Rights

by April 29, 2011

bill-of-rights-300x214_0I just listened to an excellent podcast by David Alan Grier on The Daily Crowdsource, focused on the rights of crowdsourced workers. Grier defined four broad classes of crowdsourced workers–the microlabor, partial employment, contest and public opinion worker.

We at Dialogue Earth are extremely interested in this topic, as crowdsourcing is core to our strategy, both in the way we analyze social media, and in how we produce media content to engage diverse audiences. It is critical to us that we achieve high quality, efficient work and, more importantly, that our crowdsourced workforce is treated fairly. Heck, we’d like them to feel as great about this work we do. (more…)

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What are the top 10 energy topics that the general public should understand?

by April 22, 2011

quora-pictureGetting a handle on the priority issues that should be included in Dialogue Earth’s upcoming Media Challenge is no small task, plus it needs to be done transparently and in an inclusive manner that ultimately builds trust.

Ten years ago there were fewer options for answering a tough question like this (refer to our History section for a description of the lengthy process used in an effort to identify 100 indicators to describe the condition and use of U.S. Ecosystems). Today, there are some powerful platforms that hold considerable promise for helping to expedite this process (see discussion in this recent post).

Today, we have launched an experiment using one of the prime Q&A platforms, Quora, to explore the viability of exploring answers to this question in an open and transparent manner. If you have an opinion, please jump over to Quora and make your voice heard. You can enter answers directly, and you can vote on answers provided by others. Here is the background material that I added to the question on Quora: (more…)

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Contemplating Content Crowd-Sourcing: an Interview

by February 18, 2011

Dialogue Earth’s associate director, Tom Masterman, was recently interviewed by Crowdsourcing.org about recent projects to crowd-source the creation of Dialogue Earth videos. In this post, the first of a two-part series, Tom talks with Crowdsourcing.org’s Carl Esposti about the issues of control, quality, cost and timing.

Carl Esposti: Why did Dialogue Earth consider crowdsourcing a video project?

Tom Masterman: Just the other day, I realized that crowdsourcing now pervades most aspects of the business strategy for our start-up nonprofit, Dialogue Earth. Given some personal experiences producing corporate videos, I truly wanted to avoid the unfortunate situation where you develop something in-house (or with a single contractor or agency) that you and the executive team love, but that falls flat with your target viewers. Since our goal is to communicate science in ways easily understood by a variety of audiences, it seemed worthwhile to test how the crowd would explain our key points.

(more…)

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“No Shell Blues” Wins First Video Contest

by February 13, 2011

We’re thrilled to award Cuyler Bryant’s “No Shell Blues” with first place in our pilot video contest.

To understand why a cartoon snail singing the blues about ocean acidification won our contest, let me first provide some background.
(more…)

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Our First Tongal Contest: Story Concepts For Ocean Acidification

by February 12, 2011

Although all of the story concepts were not used in the list of final winning videos for our Ocean Acidification video contest, there were seven stories that were interesting enough to be good building blocks for creative video producers.  And, even though the first place video used the first place story, we’d like to believe that the selection was mutually exclusive, depending more on story execution and production quality over which story was used.

When we started the contest, we set out to find five creative stories that had broad appeal in reaching both sides of the aisle that didn’t just preach to the choir.  In the end, we actually felt that seven of the sixty-four­ entries were good enough to be presented to the next stage of the contest; so we exercised our option to pay additional monies for the two extra stories.  In comparison to the amount of money a company can expect to pay a production/ advertising firm for just one storyboard, we felt that we got a great deal on our final seven. (more…)

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Scientific Basis for Ocean Acidification Video Contest

by February 11, 2011

When we set out to launch our first video contest, our goal was to test how well creative storytellers could run with a few key science points and create an engaging video about a science topic. As a small start-up effort, we couldn’t imagine having such great storytellers on staff, so we chose to present our challenge to the crowd via Tongal, a company that runs creative contests.

While the details of the contest will be covered elsewhere, this post focuses on the key science points for our pilot topic, ocean acidification

Your first reaction might be, “ocean what?” If so, you’re with about 75% of Americans who also haven’t heard of ocean acidification, (more…)

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